Aldo van Eyck - Playground as a place for the entire community.

To consider the city is to encounter ourselves.
To encounter the city is to rediscover the child.
If the child rediscovers the city,
the city will rediscover the child –ourselves.

-- Van Eyck, 2008 [1962]:25

 Oosterpark, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Oosterpark, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Eyck is a dutch architect who paid particular attention to the emotional & socio-cultural impacts of architecture & space.  He created street and playground infrastructure that was ambiguous in use, and regularly took into consideration the other user groups (teens, adults, elderly).

This image just below starts to connect with me.  Though underdeveloped, and quite small, it was crafted with all of the potential users in mind.  It is a space for play, as well as relaxing and passage.  All ages could find use here.  Playgrounds disguised/build into the every day.

 Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam, Netherlands

“According to van Eyck, urban playing equipment should be part of the city to the point of disappearing into everyday life and becoming ubiquitous, as it happens with telephone cabins, benches or posts.

- Nicolas Stutzin

 Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam, Netherlands

 Amsterdam, Netherlands

Amsterdam, Netherlands

 BEFORE & AFTER : Amsterdam, Netherlands

BEFORE & AFTER : Amsterdam, Netherlands

Again, I think it really is Eycks approach and thoughtfulness that sets him apart in his designwork, and his writings are well worth getting your hands on.  There are a few books out on his work including Seventeen Playgrounds by Denisa Kollarova and Anna van Lingen (which I have on order).  His own work, The Playground and the city, is hard to get a hold of save for your library... so go check it out!

Bonus Reading & Sources:

https://walkonwildsideanna.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/aldo-van-eyck-the-playgrounds-and-the-city/

https://childrenoftechnology.wordpress.com/2012/10/04/aldo-van-eyck-the-playgrounds-and-the-city/

https://merijnoudenampsen.org/2013/03/27/aldo-van-eyck-and-the-city-as-playground/